Funeral of Winston Churchill



Funeral of Winston Churchill

Funeral of Winston Churchill

Historical Context

Winston Churchill‘s funeral was on a scale befitting his place in history as the prime minister who guided Britain to victory during World War II. He died on January 24, 1965, having lived to the age of 90. The government had been planning extensively for his funeral in the years before his death, and it had to be revised several times as Churchill kept living, leading Lord Mountbatten to remark that “the pallbearers kept dying and Churchill kept living.” Continue reading “Funeral of Winston Churchill”

Idi Amin


Idi Amin

Full Name: Idi Amin Dada
Profession: Ugandan Dictator

Nationality:  Ugandan

Biography: President of Uganda from 1971 until 1979. Gained international notoriety for a rule characterized by mass repression, corruption, nepotism and economic mismanagement.

After launching a war against Tanzania in 1979, Amin was overthrown and lived in exile in Saudi Arabia until his death in 2003. Continue reading “Idi Amin”

Major Richard “Dick” Winters

Major Richard “Dick” Winters

Fallen Yet Not Forgotten

Today we remember Major Richard “Dick” Winters of New Holland, Pennsylvania. Today is Richard’s birthday. Help us wish him a Happy heavenly birthday!🎂

This true American hero was one of the commander of the Easy Company of the 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, part of the 101st Airborne Division, during World War II. Continue reading “Major Richard “Dick” Winters”

The Battle of Rorke’s Drift (1879),

The British: 139. Zulu Warriors: 4,000. Let Battle Begin

The Battle of Rorke’s Drift (1879), also known as the Defence of Rorke’s Drift, was an engagement in the Anglo-Zulu War. The successful British defence of the mission station of Rorke’s Drift, under the command of Lieutenants John Chard of the Royal Engineers and Gonville Bromhead, began when a large contingent of Zulu warriors broke off from their main force during the final hour of the British defeat at the day-long Battle of Isandlwana on 22 January 1879, diverting 6 miles (9.7 km) to attack Rorke’s Drift later that day and continuing into the following day.

Just over 150 British and colonial troops defended the station against attacks by 3,000 to 4,000 Zulu warriors. The massive but piecemeal attacks by the Zulu on Rorke’s Drift came very close to defeating the much smaller garrison, but were consistently repelled.[9] Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to the defenders, along with a number of other decorations and honours. Continue reading “The Battle of Rorke’s Drift (1879),”

Botany Bay

Botany Bay

Aerial photo of Sydney showing Botany Bay

Botany Bay (AboriginalKamay[2][3]), an open oceanic embayment,[1] is located in SydneyNew South WalesAustralia, 13 km (8 mi) south of the Sydney central business district. Its source is the confluence of the Georges River at Taren Point and the Cooks River at Kyeemagh, which flows 10 km (6 mi) to the east before meeting its mouth at the Tasman Sea, midpoint between the suburbs of La Perouse and Kurnell. The northern headland of the entrance to the bay from the Tasman Sea is Cape Banks and, on the southern side, the outer headland is Cape Solander and the inner headland is Sutherland Point. Continue reading “Botany Bay”

King Henry VIII

Henry VIII

Portrait of Henry VIII

Profession: King of England

Nationality:  English

Biography: Henry was the second Tudor monarch after his father, Henry VII. During his forty-year reign he led England through a series of intense changes, most notably the English Reformation, England’s separation from the Roman Catholic Church. Continue reading “King Henry VIII”

Churchill visiting Eisenhower in Washington, 1959, with his private secretary Sir Anthony Montague Browne

Sir Winston S. Churchill

Churchill visiting Eisenhower in Washington, 1959, with his private secretary Sir Anthony Montague Browne

Churchill visiting Eisenhower in Washington, 1959, with his private secretary Sir Anthony Montague Browne

Finest Hour 186, Fourth Quarter 2019

Page 34

By Sir Winston S. Churchill

Winston Churchill’s views on the Cold War are fairly represented in two different sets of remarks that he composed at the time. The first came in a speech he made in Washington. The second came in what was his last work of original writing intended for publication. Continue reading “Churchill visiting Eisenhower in Washington, 1959, with his private secretary Sir Anthony Montague Browne”